Product Description

A Compact Disc recording of 18th Century British and American Marches

Including a Variety of British Regimental Quicksteps

 A compact disc with a selection of over 45 18th Century British and American marches and favorite airs including a variety of British regimental quicksteps, most of which have never been recorded before. Many of the tunes are played twice enabling the listener to gain the full feeling for the music. All music was painstakingly researched and edited from primary sources and is available in the Brigade’s music books.
Tune List
  • Scotch Grey’s March
  • Troop
  • My Dog and Gun, a Troop
  • Doublings
  • God Save the King
  • Duke of York’s Favorite Troop
  • Bellisle March/Third Coldstream March
  • Second Coldstream March
  • Yankee Doodle
  • White Cockade
  • March to Boston
  • Paddy Whack
  • Duke’s March
  • Doublings of Troop/Easy Quick Step
  • Heart of Oak
  • Medley: I’ll TouzleYour Kurchy/The Lady’s Plaything
  • The Peacock
  • 40th Regt. Quickstep
  • Light Horse March
  • Second York Battalion March
  • Love Forever
  • Marquis of Granby’s March
  • 8th Regt. Quickstep
  • Sweet Richard
  • French Quick March
  • Matthew’s Hornpipe/Horse Grenadiers March (drum solo)
  • Captain Money’s March
  • Boston March
  • Successful Campaign/Soldier’s Joy
  • Welcome, Welcome Brother Debtor
  • Duke of Glouster’s March
  • Medley: 71st, 42nd, 2nd 42nd Quicksteps
  • College Hornpipe
  • First Regt. of Guards March
  • Lovely Nancy
  • 23rd Quickstep
  • 33rd Quickstep
  • 43rd Quickstep
  • Over the Hills and Far Away
  • The Turk’s March
  • The Rakes of Marlow
  • Pantheon Cotillion
  • 22nd Regt. Quickstep
  • Red Joke
  • Stony Point

About the Music

All fife melodies are from primary sources prior to 1790. A number of harmonies have been selected from slightly later sources, primarily Carr (1796) and Cushing (1805). The drum parts are based on late 18th and early 19th century drum manuals, using rudiments known to have been used in the late 18th century.

British and American armies of the late 18th century marched at two different cadences, the common step and the quick step. The common step was marched at between 60 (British) and 75 (American) paces per minute, while the quick step was 120. Scotch Grey’s March and the Duke’s March are played at both common and quick tempos so that the listener can distinguish the different cadences. Common marches do not necessarily sound slow; they are essentially played in cut time with the soldiers marching two steps per measure. My Dog and Gun, Duke of York’s Troop, Belisle March, Heart of Oak and Captain Money’s March are included as typical common marches and have been recorded at a tempo of 60 to 75 paces per minute. Quick marches are recorded at a tempo of about 105.

The American Revolution was essentially a civil war. Americans had the same cultural heritage as their British adversaries. Therefore, the same musical tunes could be heard in both British and American camps. However, a unique aspect of this recording is the inclusion of some distinctly American and British pieces. My Dog & Gun, French Quick March, and Stony Point, were transcribed by Connecticut Fife Major Nathaniel Brown, and do not appear in contemporary British sources. In addition, several British regimental quicksteps, unknown in American manuscripts, are featured.

Marches and Favorite Airs of the Brigade of the American Revolution brings to life this spirited martial music as it was heard over two hundred years ago. We hope you enjoy it.

Click below to preview  samples from Marches and Favorite Airs of the Brigade of the American Revolution: